Early Decision

Quick facts about Early Decision

  • Application Deadline: November 3
  • Notification Date: By December 15

A Closer Look

For a closer look at Early Decision at Johns Hopkins, visit the Hopkins Insider Admissions Blog (Early Decision: Is It Right For You?) or the Hopkins Forums.

About Early Decision

What is the Early Decision Plan at Johns Hopkins?

Early Decision (ED) is an option that allows students who feel sure that Johns Hopkins is their first-choice college to apply before the regular deadline and to receive their admission decision early. If admitted, it’s also a contract to enroll. If you choose to apply ED, your application and supporting materials must be submitted by November 8. (The deadline for applicants applying ED to the class of 2018 has been extended to November 8.) Each year, about 40 percent of our entering freshmen choose this option.

The Early Decision agreement is binding, so you may not apply to any other school under an early decision plan. (You may still apply to other schools under a nonbinding early action plan.) You, your parents, and your secondary school counselor will be required to sign an agreement stating that you will enroll at Johns Hopkins if admitted and withdraw any regular decision or early action applications to other schools. You will receive your decision by December 15, in time for you to make regular decision application deadlines for other schools.

Should I apply ED?

If Johns Hopkins is your first college choice and you are sure you want to make the commitment to enroll if accepted, we encourage you to apply Early Decision.

Does Johns Hopkins offer Early Action or rolling admission?

Admission is only offered through the Early Decision and Regular Decision processes.

What about financial aid?

As an Early Decision candidate, you are eligible to apply for all types of need-based aid offered at Johns Hopkins. Choosing Early Decision will not limit your financial aid options or consideration for merit scholarships.

If you are accepted ED and qualify for assistance, you will receive an estimated aid offer along with your acceptance packet. This offer is based on information submitted on the College Scholarship Service PROFILE form.

A final aid offer will follow in the spring, pending receipt of your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and your parents’ prior calendar year federal income tax returns. In the unlikely event that information on your FAFSA and tax returns varies significantly from original estimates, your financial aid package could change.

More information about financial aid and the Early Decision process is available through the Office of Student Financial Services.

Before You Submit Your Application

What if I can’t complete my application on time?

Let us know, and we’ll roll your application over to the Regular Decision pool.

After You Receive Your Decision

What happens if I’m not admitted Early Decision?

Some students who are not admitted Early Decision are deferred and re-evaluated as Regular Decision candidates. The Admissions Committee can also deny admission at the ED review.

I applied Early Decision and my application was deferred to Regular Decision. Should I send any additional information to improve my chances?

You are not required to submit any additional materials. However, if you would like to, you may submit supplemental materials to your application file for review during the RD selection process. This information could be additional standardized test results, your senior year semester grades, additional letters of recommendation, an updated rèsumè, or an additional written statement of your interest in Johns Hopkins.

Early Decision and Biomedical Engineering

I applied to the biomedical engineering major and was admitted Early Decision to the university. Have I also been admitted to the BME major?

In your acceptance packet you should have received two official Johns Hopkins letters. The first letter is from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and is signed by the dean—this is your letter of acceptance to the university. The second letter is from the Whiting School of Engineering and is signed by the dean of the school—this letter discusses whether or not you were admitted specifically to the BME major.

What are my options if I was not accepted into the BME major as an Early Decision applicant?

Early Decision applicants who applied to but were not admitted to the BME major are released from the Early Decision contract to enroll at Johns Hopkins and may apply to other colleges but must make a decision about enrollment at Johns Hopkins University and return their Candidate Reply Form to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions by January 15.

If you were not accepted to the BME program but still want to attend Johns Hopkins, you can choose to enroll by submitting the Candidate Reply Form and enrollment deposit. You do not need to select a new major at this time, but you should inform us of your academic interests when completing the Candidate Reply Form. All other majors and programs at Johns Hopkins are available to you and you may change your intended major over the summer if you choose.

If you choose not to enroll, check the appropriate box on your Candidate Reply Form and return it to us. Your application will be withdrawn from Johns Hopkins University.

Can I get into BME during my sophomore year?

If spaces open up in the BME major at the end of your freshman year, the Whiting School of Engineering will contact all Johns Hopkins freshmen regarding spaces available in the program and the process for internal transfer. This occurs rarely and most students are advised to enroll at Johns Hopkins with the knowledge that transferring into BME is a highly competitive occurrence.

My admission decision to the university was deferred to Regular Decision and my first-choice major is BME. Will I be considered for the program during Regular Decision? What are my chances?

During the Regular Decision process, you will be re-reviewed for admission to the university, as well as for admission to the BME major. Your chances for admission to both depend on the competitiveness of the overall applicant pool, as well as the strength of those applying directly to the BME major.